How To Interpret Your Blood Tests For Optimal Levels (Not Just “Average” Levels)

$19.99

This e-book will help you better understand what the optimal levels for various blood tests are, and what it might mean if your levels are higher or lower than optimal.

Product Description

In this thorough reference guide, you’ll learn:

– Which hormone may be in excess if you have muscle cramps
– The nutrient almost all fibromyalgia sufferers are deficient in
– Recognize pre-diabetes 10 years before you even start to have symptoms
– The electrolyte that you MUST keep an eye on if you take aspirin
– The two numbers you must know to find out if you are getting too much protein or too little protein in your diet
– The #1 nutrient to check if you work a night shift or have a sleeping problem (excessive sleepiness, difficulty sleeping, irregular hours, etc.)
– How to know if you are getting enough magnesium, vitamin B-6, vitamin B12, vitamin D, and other important nutrients without having to test them directly
– The most important indicator of your risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, bacterial infections, and cirrhosis (fatty liver)
– MUCH MORE!
When you have your blood tested as part of a routine medical screening or as a way of detecting a possible illness or imbalance in your body, your levels of a variety of parameters (cholesterol, liver enzymes, red blood cells, white blood cells, thyroid hormone, testosterone, estrogen, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and others, depending on what labwork your doctor ordered) are measured against the results from every other person who submitted bloodwork to that lab. As long as your test results are in the average range for the rest of the population, you will be considered healthy. However, what’s healthy for the average population as a whole is not reflective of what is optimal for YOU.

You may have some very real chronic symptoms, even though your blood tests all appear “normal.” In contrast, you may feel like you are in the best health of your life, while your doctor tries to tell you that you are sick because some of your blood tests were outside the normal range.

For instance, if the average level for thyroid stimulating hormone among the population tested by your lab was between 1.9 and 7.4, and your thyroid stimulating hormone tests as 7.4, your thyroid stimulating hormone will be considered normal and your doctor will see no reason to suspect any health complaints related to your thyroid. However, you may have some very real symptoms such as a sluggish metabolism, weight gain, tiredness, difficulty sleeping, depression, and even infertility. Your doctor may tell you it’s all in your head and prescribe anti-depressants or just tell you to eat less and exercise more!

This e-book will help you better understand what the optimal levels for various blood tests are, and what it might mean if your levels are higher or lower than optimal. While this should not be construed as medical advice or a substitute for an appointment with your doctor, this e-book is a learning tool that can help you take control over your own health and learn more about what your body is telling you.

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